Why I’m proud to be a biased journalist…

In 1997-98 I took a postgraduate diploma in broadcast journalism at JOMEC which is part of Cardiff University. It was one of the best years of my life, and I made many friends.  As part of an expansion of the journalism school they asked me if I would like to write a 250 word piece on my thoughts...

What Brexit means for your finances in 2017

In June 2016, the day after the European Union referendum vote, I wrote an instant first impressions news analysis guide on what Brexit is likely to mean for your finances. Now for the start of 2017, I’m braving revisiting that guide – in the form of this blog, to see how well it stacks up and what has changed.

What Brexit means for your finances in 2017

In June 2016, the day after the European Union referendum vote, I wrote an instant first impressions news analysis guide on what Brexit is likely to mean for your finances. Now for the start of 2017, I’m braving revisiting that guide – in the form of this blog, to see how well it stacks up and what...

Should you buy euros/dollars now before the EU referendum vote?

The pound has tanked in recent months. Last year £1 bought you as much as €1.43, now it’s just €1.26. Against the dollar, last year’s high was $1.58, now it’s just $1.42. Some of this is on the back of the uncertainty about the EU referendum. Back in March I wrote a blog responding to the huge number of questions about the...

Citizens Advice launches the (gulp) ‘Martin Lewis Fund’

Citizens Advice is an amazing charity of professionals and volunteers who help people with debt, legal, consumer rights and a range of other issues.  This week the organisation is announcing it’s setting up the ‘Martin Lewis Fund’ using money from a recent donation I made, and I thought it’d be good to explain what it’s doing. And...

How to vote in the EU referendum

It’s the biggest consumer decision any of us will ever make. It affects our economy, foreign policy, immigration policy, security and sovereignty. Our vote on whether the UK should leave the EU will reverberate through our lifetimes, and those of our children and grandchildren.   If you’ve already made up your mind how to vote, good. I’m...

The viral letter about mis-sold student loans due to retrospective interest hikes is well meaning, but wrong

The papers are full of an angry letter from recent graduate Simon Crowther to his MP, which has been shared over 20,000 times, complaining about retrospective hikes to student loan interest.  The letter is well meaning and does a good job in raising awareness. It’s been in all the newspapers, and indeed in articles in Huffington Post and...

The Money and Mental Health Policy Institute – what’ll it really do?

A month ago I announced I was founding the new Money and Mental Health Policy Institute. It has just gained charitable status, and as this is Mental Health Awareness Week, I wanted to explain more about it. The article below is primarily one that was first published in The Telegraph on the launch of the institute. Debt and...

Two sides to every story – apparently I was ‘prickly’ to a journalist when he followed me in the street!

I was slightly shocked today to read a journalist having a go at me for being ‘prickly’. That certainly isn’t my way. Here’s what Jim Armitage wrote in The Independent… Too grand to talk to journalists? I interviewed MoneySupermarket boss Peter Plumb for a big profile article at his swanky corner office near Soho on Wednesday evening. On my...

Student loan hike: Meeting with Universities Minister to propose mitigation measures

Student loan repayments are being retrospectively hiked from April 2017 – so 100,000s of students and graduates who started uni since 2012 will pay more than they signed up for. In my view, this is against natural justice. So, I’ve been campaigning on it, and today had a meeting with Jo Johnson, Universities Minister, to come up with...