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Is it age or a different generation that makes older people more trusting?

Is it age or a different generation that makes older people more trusting?

Is it age or a different generation that makes older people more trusting?

I was mulling today about my grandmother who is now in her early 90s. A few years ago, before her dementia sadly progressed so far as to make this issue redundant, she would constantly call me after a salesman had come to her door, asking me if she should switch to their product.

When I asked her why, the answer was always the same, "because the salesman told me it was cheaper". I always replied, "Grandma, you know what I do for a job, I promise I have made sure you are on the very cheapest possible tariff."

Yet, for her, the simple fact someone had told her it was cheaper meant they had to be telling the truth. She spoke of coming from a trusting world – my explaining this was just a commission-based seller using it as an opening line didn’t cut any mustard.

I hear similar tales repeated by many people about their parents as they delve further into old age. 

Now, of course there is no universality here. There are many extremely savvy people out there far older than my grandmother. Yet, it certainly does seem, anecdotally at least, that there is a trend of our older generation being more trusting.

What I am interested to know is, is this an age thing or a generational thing? 

Do we tend to become more trusting as we get older or is this about the ‘war generation’? This generation lived through a time when everyone in the country had to pull together and look after each other to enable them to survive, a better mannered time – is it because of this they have a greater belief that most people are honest and trustworthy? My suspicion is that it probably is. 

That’s not to say that younger generations aren’t trusting, but in a different way. In general I am a great believer that most people are good. 

If you ask somebody to do something for you they will generally do it well, even a stranger, without stealing your stuff or letting you down.  I’ve written before of my joy at seeing the person ahead of me in an ATM queue chase after the person in front of them as they’d walked away with their card but left the cash dangling.

However, when it comes to business and the corporate world I believe we live in an adversarial consumer society. A company’s job is to make money, our job is to stop them. Companies will tweak every possible profit-making nipple and at the sales end of it, if that includes manipulating the facts and using sales techniques to create openings, then they will.

I’d love your thoughts – are the older generation usually more trusting? And if so, why do you think that is… (and to know your age too would be interesting in this).

Foodbank financial triage – an update

Foodbank financial triage – an update

Foodbank financial triage – an update

In August I blogged that I was going to fund a radical pilot scheme to get financial triage into foodbanks with the Trussell Trust.

The idea is that when people are asking for food, it’s a great time to try and help them manage their money and see what help is available – so hopefully the trip to a foodbank (to which people are often referred by a health or social agency) will be a one off.

For full details on the scheme and my involvement read my I’m excited to be involved in financial triage at foodbanks blog post.

The Trussell Trust has just sent its first progress report to me, so I thought I’d share it, as I know many of you were interested.

"Six food banks have been lined up to participate in the pilot. They are:

  • Hammersmith and Fulham
  • Stroud
  • Coventry
  • Cardiff
  • Durham
  • Dundee

Plus Tower Hamlets which we will wind into the pilot as they have already implemented a programme which is still running. No money will go to them directly, however we will include their results.

We have lined up and have spoken to all initial Partners: CAP, Turn2us, CMA, Money Advice Trust, CAB.

Following all press including Martin‘s interview, the Trussell Trust received 57 enquiries from potential partners wishing to participate in the pilot. Whilst the above listed have been chosen to participate, the others are being managed until such a time it is appropriate to proceed with them.

Computers have been organised for all trial Partners (at nil cost to the project, sourced through Avios air miles promotion by being their charity partner).

David has visited Northern Ireland where he has put the wheels in motion as follows:

  • Set up and agree terms for NI ( Northern Ireland) using Advice NI.
  • Advertised for a Project Coordinator. Interviews will be held on 13th October."

So we’re about to be up and running. It’s great to see so many people engaging with this.

Cancelling the 55% tax on unused pension pots could be a disaster for many older people

Cancelling the tax on unused pension pots could be a disaster for many older people

Cancelling the 55% tax on unused pension pots could be a disaster for many older people

In the last Budget, Chancellor George Osborne announced he was freeing up much of the pension market so people could take their  money when they wanted – 25% of it tax free and the rest at their income tax rate.

Today, at the Conservative Conference, he has said  that if over 75s do that and die, and there’s money that hasn’t been touched in their pension pot yet, instead of their estate paying the current 55% tax when its passed on; they’ll pay it at their marginal rate (full info in the death tax news story).

This is a big pre-election giveaway to older voters, likely on the back of the scares about UKIP defectors. At a first glance, both these proposals seem wonderful, giving people more choice in the pension market and a greater ability to leave it to their dependants. (I shall ignore the wider  philosophical debate over cuts in inheritance tax – which is a tax to stop perpetuating inherited privilege and wealth – that’s a discussion for another day).   
Yet I have some real concerns over unintended consequences – so I’m quickly bashing out this blog as a stream of consciousness. I’d love to know your opinion on it.

The issue isn’t people overspending, it’s people underspending

When the pension liberalisation policy was first launched, one big headline concerned the risk that people would  simply cash in their pension, buy a Porsche and the state would have to look after them in their old age.

Of course this can happen, but I suspect only with a trivial number of people. In fact as I explained in my The Chancellor’s pension changes are wonderful and horrid blog, the real worry for me is the opposite of this.

I am concerned that someone who has a pension – be it  £20,000 or  £200,000 – when they retire at say 67 knows it must last them the rest of their life, and a natural fear means they will be very reticent to touch it.
 
It will be left sitting there and that worry that if they spend it now they will have no money later on  in life, means they will leave it there growing but unused, not helping them in their life in the way that a pension is designed to.

That was the one  benefit of an annuity: you cashed your money in and you got a payment each year for the rest of your life – a real genuine income. The big problem with annuities of course, was that the amount that you got wasn’t big enough.

Under the new system of pension  freedom, the only way to really decide how much you should be spending each year is to know when you will die. Now that isn’t that easy, although actuarial charts and your health and situation can you give you a rough indication of when this will be.

Of course you could get it wrong, so as a rule of thumb I would assume you are going to die 10 years later  than the prediction and spend your money accordingly. But I simply don’t believe people will do that. Take these examples…

If you look at people who saved up for retirement planning to live off their savings in the bank (as opposed to pension savings). With interest rates lower than inflation, effectively the money is shrinking. Therefore it makes logical sense to spend some of the capital to live off, as the income isn’t enough. 

Yet the psychology of it means people are, albeit understandably, simply are unwilling to spend the capital that they have; they only want to live off the interest.

This situation I suspect will be mirrored for many in not using the cash in their pension pot too quickly.

The cutting of tax could make that worse

The idea is that the money can be just as efficiently left to your inheritors as it is for you to spend it. I think this will perpetuate this psychological problem. Of course, there are some more affluent people who will see it as a great way to be able to leave money to their dependants by not touching their pension and using other funds.

Yet many on lower incomes already have guilty old ages, worried they’re "spending my child’s inheritance", even though sometimes their children are more affluent and have better lives. Pension money is meant to be there for you, not your dependants, to give you a decent standard of living in your old age.

Yesterday when I was filming for my  television roadshow, I spoke to the son of a woman who had a decent but not huge of  amount in savings who was desperate to give it away to her children to avoid  inheritance tax. She was 78 and in decent health, but what was she going to live on for the rest of her life?

So indeed my great fear with this change is more people will restrain and constrain their spending far too much on money that is supposed to support them – knowing it could go in an efficient way to their kids.

Would guidance and education alleviate the worry?

The Chancellor has said he wants people to take guidance when they take their pension so they will understand these issues. The amount of money initially put into the pot to fund this -  up to £20m for the first two years – is actually relatively small for giving guidance to all pensioners; certainly if advising them the way I would prefer, at a proper level where people will take liability for the advice that is coming across, rather than what could just be generic twaddle if not done right.  

So my great concern is not that I have a principled objection to the freedoms of the pension market, nor even  necessarily to allowing people to inherit with lower tax. What I do worry about  is that we do have a primarily financially underskilled population who are not equipped to deal with these issues.

We already know that from the fact that when  people retired in the annuity market, even though there was an open market  choice where they were able to go right across the market to get the best  annuity rate, the majority of people (60%, according to a 2012 study by the Association of British Insurers) didn’t do that. Instead they just kept with their pension provider’s annuity so losing income every year for the rest of their life.

I don’t think that enough of the current generation retiring population (especially those with smaller pension pots) are well equipped enough to deal with the freedoms. You may call me paternalistic, but I think we need more protections in place to help people manage their finances well when they retire.

I’d love your thoughts?

Try the new mobile friendly MoneySavingExpert.com

Try the new mobile friendly MoneySavingExpert.com

Try the new mobile friendly MoneySavingExpert.com

We’re in the midst of a huge exercise to make the main site more mobile friendly guide by guide (this blog hasn’t been made more mobile friendly yet, so don’t judge the project on this). In fact, what we’re actually doing is making the site responsive. In other words, the page will scale and change depending on how big your screen is.

So while the content will always be the same (we decided not to cut it down for mobile – if it’s important enough to say, we should say it regardless of the format), it will look different on a smartphone, tablet, laptop or desktop monitor.

This isn’t the first time I’ve mentioned it. I wrote last December that we were starting the project in my Making MSE work better on mobiles blog post and I wanted to update you today on where we are.

It’s actually been a much bigger challenge than we first thought. To make it work, we’ve had to effectively redo each guide for desktops too. We’ve now got a great team working full time just on this though so you should start to notice a difference quickly.

Here’s one we prepared earlier…

Take a look at our 35 ways to boost your credit rating guide on your desktop and on a mobile to see the type of thing we’re doing (note the change to 35 tips isn’t part of this, that was a deliberate style change just for this guide – and not part of the ‘mobilisation’).

I hope it renders well for you and is much easier to read now it fits well on the page. However, it’s not fully finished. In the next couple of weeks we’ll be adding an ‘In This Guide’ hamburger menu icon to all the mobile-optimised guides. You will then be able to click on this to see (and easily navigate to) all the chapter headings and sub-headings of a guide.

PS. The forum is in the midst of a redesign too. Logged-in users will be able to try the new version and many have been using it for months.

What’s the rollout plan?

There are already a good number of articles and guides on the site that have been updated in this format and over the next couple of months, a big chunk of the rest of the content will also be done.

Once that’s done, it’s time to work on the taxonomy of the site – in other words, the navigation structure of the sections – and then once that’s done, we can redesign the home pages and section pages to be more responsive too. After that, we’ll tackle some of the big site tools.

Do let me know what you think of the mobile friendly articles, are they doing it for you?

Going abroad? I need your help….

If I had a euro for each time I’ve been asked a variant of this question by holidaymakers, "I’ve just been to a bank/shop and it’s giving me the choice of paying in euros/dollars or pounds, which should I choose?", I’d err, have a lot of euros.

For a detailed answer see my Always pay in euros blog post, which as the title suggests, explains the safe option is to always pay in euros.

However my experimentation and rate comparison that underpins that blog was done primarily in Spain, so I wanted to take the opportunity this summer with so many people going away to spread my research base.

What I’d like you to do

If you’re going abroad and meet a shop or cash machine that gives you this option, I’d like you to take a picture of the screen or receipt which explains the rate it’s offering… (example below).

Banca March ATM withdrawal screen

Banca March ATM withdrawal screen

Then please email it to me at payineuros@moneysavingexpert.com and also if possible, include the following:

1. Where you are (country and location).
2. The date and time.
3. If you know the spot rate on the day (if you don’t, don’t worry – I can find it).

My aim is to get an accurate comparison of how this compares to paying in pounds – all around the world.

Thank you in advance.