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Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

I’m excited to be involved in a radical financial triage foodbanks programme

I’m excited to be involved in a radical financial triage at foodbanks programme

I’m excited to be involved in a radical financial triage at foodbanks programme

A radical experiment is about to start involving the Trussell Trust and I’m delighted to be playing a part. Rather than regurgitating, here is the charity’s press release which tells you all…

"FOODBANKS TO LAUNCH RADICAL ‘FINANCIAL TRIAGE’ PROGRAMME"

Foodbank charity the Trussell Trust is to launch pilot funded by a 6-figure personal donation from Money Saving Expert Martin Lewis.

This pioneering idea is a response to the alarming increase in people being referred to foodbanks in severe financial difficulty. The scheme could revolutionise how the UK’s leading foodbank charity works and will see foodbanks partner with debt and money-management charities to provide instant financial help to people in foodbanks at the point of crisis.

The pilot is announced as new research shows that more than one in ten UK families have taken out a pay day loan to make ends meet in the last year (12%) and a quarter (24%) of UK families have fallen into debt to be able to provide for the family. Over 900,000 people received three days’ emergency food from Trussell Trust foodbanks in 2013/14 financial year, 163% more than the previous year.

David McAuley, Trussell Trust Chief Executive says: "It’s deeply concerning that the basics of dignified life in modern Britain – food, heat and electricity – can fall out of reach for so many. High prices, static incomes, problems with benefits and harsh welfare sanctioning are forcing people into extreme financial difficulty.

"When you’re facing stark choices between eviction or feeding the family, debt and high interest loans can seem to offer a short term solution, the reality is that this often forces finances to spiral out of control.

"By introducing a ‘financial triage’ service in foodbanks, where clients are able to connect with free financial and debt advice, people will be given professional help to manage tight finances, avoid pay day lenders and structure debt to prevent the situation from getting worse and to help people break out of crisis much faster."

Martin Lewis’ donation, to be supplemented by additional funds from the Trussell Trust, will enable the charity to develop the first stage of a transformative ‘more than food’ approach to foodbanks, where foodbanks in the pilot project become a ‘hub’ of local service provision.

People in need will be able to access a range of support including emergency food, debt advice and money management all in one location, removing access barriers and cutting down waiting times.

Connecting people with financial support at the point of crisis will also help reduce the workloads of already over-stretched debt and money-management charities by helping to decrease the number of people developing complex and entrenched financial problems.

Despite the evidence of economic recovery, the benefits are not yet filtering down to people living on the breadline. Life is not likely to get easier for the poorest anytime soon which is why finding innovative ways to help people living on low-incomes is urgent.

Martin Lewis says: "The hope is that this scheme will provide a financial equivalent of ‘give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime’. I’ve been campaigning for financial education in schools for years, finally that starts on the curriculum in September, but that still leaves great swathes of our society, especially some of the most needy struggling with even the basics of money management.

"Those who go to foodbanks are already open to asking for help. They’ve rightly prioritised the urgent need to feed themselves and their children. Yet if we can intervene at that point to start to get their financial lives back on track, by approachable, non-judgemental help, it will hopefully cut down the number of return visits."

The Trussell Trust runs a network of over 400 foodbanks across the UK that give emergency food and support to people in crisis and, if the pilot is successful, this could be rolled out across the UK in 2015/16.

The pilot scheme will initially be launched in six Trussell Trust foodbanks in different regions of the UK, aiming to improve the financial standing of foodbank users and to improve their household budgetary skills. The scheme will partner with national UK debt charities to offer professional debt counselling services for up to 20 hours a week per centre in each region.

The pilot will start in September 2014.

Related past blogs

How would you describe Lidl? Is it really “poor food for poor people”?

How would you describe Lidl? Is it really “poor food for poor people”?

How would you describe Lidl? Is it really “poor food for poor people”?

The papers were full of it yesterday on the back of Lidl announcing sales of premium vintage and non-vintage wines such as Châteauneuf-du-Pape. All the messages were on about posh goods next to the usual tat. The phrase that came up time and time again was that "the firm is trying to move away from its poor food for poor people image".

I found this interesting, as I think it’s perhaps a legacy of a long-gone time. It’s not close to how I would characterise Lidl (or Aldi) and so I’m interested to find out if this is a true reflection of the general perception of Lidl, both among those who shop there and those who don’t.

Certainly a basket of shopping at Lidl can be very cheap. True too is the fact that it is used by many as a place to cheaply stock up on your bog roll and necessities – with a catch-up shop for the other stuff done at the main supermarkets. Yet for me this is less about quality of food and more about the range of choice.

I would categorise both Lidl and Aldi as ‘limited brand’ supermarkets – when you shop in them, you don’t necessarily get the brands you are used to, nor do you get the great plethora of options for each food item that you do elsewhere.

Instead, you get a limited choice of own brand and other brands – far fewer options of your tinned tuna than in a large Tesco store. But this is the defining point – a limited number of choices doesn’t necessarily limit quality.

So my question, which I’d love you to feedback on below is; what is YOUR perception of Lidl and Aldi? And do say whether you shop there or not.

Nerdvana: The important maths of supermarket self-service checkout queue speed.

Nerdvana: The important maths of supermarket self-service queue speed.

Nerdvana: The important maths of supermarket self-service queue speed.


My heart sank a touch on Tuesday at the potentially dire state of public maths. While queuing at the supermarket, there were two neighbouring banks of self-service tills each with six people queuing. The issue? One had four tills, the other two.

This blog is dedicated to the inspiration that is Dr Sheldon Cooper

It seems many people had avoided the simple maths, doable either by observable instinct or observation, that the first tranche of tills had an average 1.5 people queuing per till, while the second had three people.

When I tweeted and Facebooked this, many people came up with potential reasons for the queue disparity. In this case none were true, but they do bear examination.

  • “They may have seen old or stupid people ahead.” While I’m not sure I accept the assertion that older people are any less capable, or that you can judge by looking at someone’s self-service checkout skills, I’ll ignore that for a second.If you were unlucky enough to be stuck behind a till-doofus, maths plays a part here too…

    Bank of two tills: A doofus blocking it reduces the number of tills by 50%

    Bank of four tills: A doofus blocking it reduces the number of tills by 25%.

    Therefore it would need double the doofuses (or is it doofi?) to have the same impact with more tills. Thus, even with one potential doofus in the queue, the bank of four tills wins.

  • “People may’ve been counting the items each person had.” These were basket-only queues. So the item range is, let’s say, from one to 20. Yet the time taken to check out does not vary in line with the number of items – it doesn’t take twice as long to check out two items as it does for one.

    Much of self-service time is spent starting, sorting bags, paying and dealing with ‘unexpected items in the bagging area’. This substantially reduces the risk of this playing a huge factor, and with six people in the queue you’re likely to be moving towards a more normalised variance in each queue anyway.

  • “Alcohol and dangerous goods.” This one is bang on, as they require a member of staff to sign the customer through, causing a delay. However, the impact follows on much the same lines as the doofus argument above.
  • “The queue you join always moves more slowly after you’ve joined it.” Many feel they have empirical data to prove the truth of this (ie, it’s happened to us all). Even if we exclude memory bias (we remember the bad times more than the good) and accept it as a rock-solid certainty of Sod, it is irrelevant.

    By definition, this rule applies regardless of the queue joined, therefore it’s ‘on both sides of the equation’ and thus can be cancelled out. In other words, if you’re going to be unlucky, you may as well be unlucky in the queue with the better chance of moving more quickly.

  • “Some people may want to queue longer.” I must admit I hadn’t thought of the perverse motivation factor. I had assumed everyone would want to reduce queuing time to a minimum. However, I’m wrong. There are of course some strange fetishes out there, and self-service queuing could be one of them.

    Surely though, this is only a relatively small proportion of our great island nation. Even for just one of the six people in the bad-maths queue, to be so en-fetished seems unlikely. However, let’s assume they were. Even so, that leaves two others who shouldn’t have been there.

  • “People are too stressed or tired to work it out.”While for a geek like me it is counter-intuitive (I was massively busy and rushed, so therefore working out relative queue speed was a priority, not something to ignore), I accept the likelihood of this thesis.

    Yet that does sort-of take me back to where I started.This is a very simple bit of what should be intuitive maths. I wonder whether the fact people feel too tired to do it is a result of poor applied mathematics skills? In truth, all you need do is look and see one block has more tills, but the queue is the same length.

As for the empirical result? I joined the queue of four tills as the seventh member, and exactly as the maths would predict, arrived at a till at almost exactly the same time as the person who was fourth in the other queue.

The Calorie Saving Expert diet

The Calorie Saving Expert diet

The Calorie Saving Expert diet

Many MoneySaving techniques can be applied to dieting/healthy eating – I know, I do it myself. It’s all about adopting a ‘should I spend the calories?’ attitude…

I’m writing this after a discussion on my regular Radio 5 Live Consumer Panel slot. While in the studio, the UK Chief Medical officer was interviewed and I got involved, talking about how I manage my calorie intake (see my I lost 1 stone six pounds blog).

So I thought I would jot down a few, calorie saving expert (or more accurately amateur enthusiast in this case) thoughts…

  • It’s all about scarce resources  

    In the same way as the amount we have to spend is limited, so is the amount of calories we can consume. Overeating and overspending both have negative effects, one too many pounds the other too few.

    Unlike money though, the maximum calorie consumption we each can have is more egalitarian, there are far less differences between what we can eat (about 2,000 calories per day for women, 2,500 for men – but with some variance due to exercise levels – and reduced if you’re trying to lose as opposed to maintain weight).

    Of course fat intake and what you eat in terms of fruit and veg matters too, but I’m going to stick with calories for simplicity.

  • Check the cost before you buy

    The only way to know if you can afford something is to check the price, the same is true with calories. The calorie differences between ‘sandwiches’ for example can be huge – don’t assume they’re all the same. 

  • Be aware of the calories in your pocket

    It’s about thinking of the bigger picture – how many calories you have a day or a week. If you’re not good at keeping a mental track, then note it down on a piece of paper so you can budget.

  • Think of the opportunity cost

    The most important idea is about trading off one calorie for another. So while you may fancy ‘another coffee’, if that’s a milky coffee it could be 200 or 300 calories. Would you prefer that or a Mars bar? Or even a bigger meal in the evening? Being aware of the calories allows you to manage what you eat by saving now for spending later.

  • Beware spending calories on drinks

    When I first lost weight this was the biggest lesson. Drinks, especially fizzy drinks or fruit juice are usually full of calories. By shifting to low or no calorie drinks (including water or non-milky coffee/tea) you recoup loads of calories which are better to eat.

  • Need crisps, go low calorie

    While I adore crisps, the fat and calorie content of a pack of McCoy’s or Walkers can be huge, easily over 200 calories. For a very little switch to French Fries, Quavers, Hula Hoops, Monster Munch (normal-sized, not a grab-bag) you get a similar effect but with less than half the calories spent.

  • Earn more to spend more

    If you want a calorie splurge, you need to work for it (bit like with cash). So go for a long run, do some serious exercise and then you can feel comfortable about going for a big feast knowing you’ve earned it.

  • Follow the calorie mantas

    The Martin’s Money Mantras for spending money are well established, but they work equally well on calories. The questions for if you’re skint, work well for those who are dieting:

    Do I need it?

    Can I afford it?

    Have I checked if less calories are available in something else?

  • Crack the eating impulses

    The host of techniques to stop you spending when you don’t need to, can be applied to eating too. The most potent is about planning.

    Pre-arranging what you eat, so you know what your next meal is and when it’s coming help control the urges and let you stick within your calorie budget.

  • Demotivate yourself

    I should probably build a calorie equivalent of the Demotivator tool, that could work out how many calories and therefore pounds you would save by giving up your usual latte a day.  Yet the principle is similar, cutting out a few unnecessary treats doesn’t feel like much, but if you do it regularly it can have a big effect over a long period.

Of course no-one’s saying it’s easy. And just like with debt, a change of circumstance, mental health and focus have just as much to do with it as pure ‘don’t overspend’ yet maybe phrasing it this way will help some.

Please let me know using the links below any more lessons from money that can be applied to dieting.


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Kit Kat Crunching Crime

The victim: a 2 finger Kit KatWhile this may sound trivial, and indeed is, I need to admit horror at something my friend Richard did at our house over the weekend.

He had a Kit Kat two finger packet, and instead of breaking it into fingers, simply bit across both fingers as if it was a single bar, entirely ignoring the Kit Kat’s multi-sectioned functionality.

I’m not sure why, but I was quite shocked at this, it seemed plain wrong. Is it just me?

Comment and Discuss